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Knife Set

Best Knife Sets in The Netherlands - Reviews and Comparison 2021

We picked the 7 best knife sets in 2021 for your budget and use cases.

If you are all prepared to buy a new knife set and just have a few questions before you add the best set to the cart, then this buyer’s guide will help you out. The reviews on the top seven knife sets of 2021 will make your job easier to select the best knife set.

UPDATED

9/29/2022

model

ourRating

rating

Blade Material

prosCons

Weight

Number of Knives

Total Number of Items

Elements Knife Set

Knife Block

Knife Block Material

Handle Material

Dishwasher Safe

Colour

Anti-slip Foot

KYU knife block

Richardson Sheffield

KYU knife block

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Chrome molybdenum vanadium steel

Precision blades
Silk-polished ergonomic handles
8 cm wide block combines the traditional Japanese arch shape and fits in all kitchens
The highest quality material has been used for long-lasting durability
Modern design
2.7 kg
5
6
Vegetable knife, universal knife, santoku, cutting knife, bread knife, and knife block
Pine lacquered
Steel
Brown, black, and silver

Zwilling

Twin Gourmet Knife block, 9-piece

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Stainless steel

Long-lasting sharpness, sturdy and flexible due to the ice-hardened fridour blade
Easily sharpen knives with the supplied sharpening steel
Sustainable and corrosion resistant
High-quality material
A sharpening angle of 30° has been provided so that the knives in the knife block remain sharp for a long time
2.83 kg
7
9
Peeling and garnishing knife, universal knife, carving knife, chef’s knife, bread knife, meat fork, sharpening steel, scissors, and knife block
Wood
Plastic
Black and silver

Hecef

Black Oxide Knife Set of 6

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High carbon stainless steel

Professionally sharpened blade
Soft and ergonomic handles
Corrosion and rust-resistant
Black oxide procedure ensures it never loses its premium colour
Matching blade guards protect blades from unwanted scratches or dings
800 g
5
10
Chef knife, bread knife, santoku, slicing knife, utility knife, paring knife and cover for each knife
Not applicable
PP (polypropylene) + TPR (thermo-plastic-rubber)
Not mentioned
Black
Not applicable

Velaze

Stainless Steel Kitchen Knife Block

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Stainless steel

High-quality steel blades are resistant to stains, rust and bacteria
Blades are sharp for a precise cut
Modern and scientific design
The knives feel comfortable in hand and are easy to use
Ergonomic handles
2.16 kg
11
14
6 serrated steak knives, 1 shredded bread knife, 1 carving knife, 1 chef’s knife, 1 paring knife, 1 utility knife, scissors, a sharpening rod and an acrylic holder
Acrylic
Stainless steel
Grey
Not mentioned

Zwilling

Self-sharpening Knife Block, 7-Piece

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Stainless steel

Ceramic knife sharpeners in the slots sharpen the knives when they are removed
Special melts are used for the knives of the series four stars- the steel used meets the highest requirements
Ice-hardened blades
Optimal blade sharpness is maintained for a longer
Easy to clean
3 kg
5
7
Spick and garnish knife, carving knife. chef’s knife, universal knife, bread knife, multifunctional scissors, and knife block
Not mentioned
Not mentioned
Grey

Kitano

8-piece Knife Set

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Stainless steel

Hardened blades are ideal for chopping, filleting, weighing and shredding
Lightweight, slip-resistant and ergonomic handles
Minimalistic design
Plexiglas cover on the top and the guided insertion slots protect the blades
The lower slots in the knife block allow moisture to escape and prevent bacteria from forming
2 kg
7
8
Chef knife, bread knife, filleting knife, universal knife, small cooking knife, santoku, peeling knife, and a knife block
Steel
Steel
Black and silver
Not mentioned

Jamie Oliver

Acacia Knife Block 6 Pieces

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Stainless steel

The description is given at the handle’s end
Ergonomic handle for precise and comfortable use
High-quality material
Durable
The narrow, discreet design fits perfectly into any kitchen
4.2 kg
6
7
Bread knife, cutting blade, chef’s knife, universal blade, mini santoku, vegetable knife, and acacia wood block
Acacia wood
Stainless steel
Not mentioned
Black and silver

Richardson Sheffield

KYU knife block


1

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€103.50

€103.50

prosCons

Precision blades
Silk-polished ergonomic handles
8 cm wide block combines the traditional Japanese arch shape and fits in all kitchens
The highest quality material has been used for long-lasting durability
Modern design

features

Blade Material

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Chrome molybdenum vanadium steel

Weight

2.7 kg

Number of Knives

5

Total Number of Items

6

Elements Knife Set

Vegetable knife, universal knife, santoku, cutting knife, bread knife, and knife block

Knife Block

Knife Block Material

Pine lacquered

Handle Material

Steel

Dishwasher Safe

Colour

Brown, black, and silver

Anti-slip Foot

Your guides

Aditi Lohia

Aditi Lohia

Buyer’s Guide - Best Knife Set in The Netherlands

Chop like a Pro!

1

Features: Most important purchase criteria for a knife set

What features you must look for when buying a new knife set?

2

FAQ: Learn more about the details

Any questions left? Here they are, including answers.

3

How-To: Usage hints and care instructions for a knife set

Best practices for a knife set usage and care.

4

Did you know: Interesting facts, figures and things to know about knife set

Gain in-depth knowledge about knife sets and knives.

5

Our Picks: How we picked the best knife sets

Find out how we selected and ranked the products.

1. Features: Most important purchase criteria for a knife set

1.1 Parts

A knife consists of various parts, and since you are here to buy the best, it is best to get accustomed to the common terminology and basic anatomy of a kitchen knife.

Blade: The knife’s entire portion is known as the blade consisting of the edge, spine, point, etc.

Bolster: It is the place where the blade and the handle join.

Butt: The end of the handle is known as the butt.

Edge: An edge is that portion of the blade that does the cutting.

Granton Edge: It is a trademarked feature when the blade has scallops extending toward the middle of the blade. It enhances a knife’s slicing ability.

Handle: This is the second significant portion of the knife. A knife is held through a handle.

Point: It refers to the tip of the knife that’s used for puncturing.

Rivet: These are the pins that affix the handle scales to the tang.

Scale: It refers to the moulded materials that attach to the tang and make up the handle.

Spine: This is the typically unsharpened back of a blade.

Tang: That portion of a blade that extends into the handle is called the tang. It comes in various shapes and lengths, including full tangs, partial tangs, skeletonised tangs, and more.

A knife consists of various parts, and since you are here to buy the best, it is best to get accustomed to the common terminology and basic anatomy of a kitchen knife.

Blade: The knife’s entire portion is known as the blade consisting of the edge, spine, point, etc.

Bolster: It is the place where the blade and the handle join.

Butt: The end of the handle is known as the butt.

Edge: An edge is that portion of the blade that does the cutting.

Granton Edge: It is a trademarked feature when the blade has scallops extending toward the middle of the blade. It enhances a knife’s slicing ability.

Handle: This is the second significant portion of the knife. A knife is held through a handle.

Point: It refers to the tip of the knife that’s used for puncturing.

Rivet: These are the pins that affix the handle scales to the tang.

Scale: It refers to the moulded materials that attach to the tang and make up the handle.

Spine: This is the typically unsharpened back of a blade.

Tang: That portion of a blade that extends into the handle is called the tang. It comes in various shapes and lengths, including full tangs, partial tangs, skeletonised tangs, and more.

1.2 Types

If you think you can name every type of kitchen knife, well, you might think again after reading further!

General

  • Chef’s Knife: It is a straight-edged knife with a belly that curves toward the point. Its blade length varies from 6 inches to 14 inches, but its popular length is 8 inches. It is an all-purpose knife used for everything from cutting large pieces of beef to chopping vegetables.

  • Paring Knife: It is a smaller knife and often complements the chef’s knife. Its blade length remains between 3 inches to 4 inches. It is used to do all the finer work that an oversized chef’s knife can’t, such as deveining shrimp, peeling, and slicing.

  • Utility Knife: It looks the same and functions as a chef’s knife, but it’s smaller and certainly more versatile. Its blade length remians between 4 and 7 inches. Before the chef’s knife, this was the multipurpose knife, but now it’s been primarily used for tasks like cutting meat.

  • Bread Knife: Due to the large serrations, it is one of the most recognisable kitchen knives. It can feature blades up to 10 inches with serrations the entire length. Because of serrations, its uses are limited, but you can also cut tomatoes using this.

  • Table Knife: Table knife, also called a butter knife, is a standard kitchen knife that comes with every utensil set. It has a round blade with slight serrations. It is a versatile tool used while eating, including cutting things and spreading butter.

  • Steak Knife: The steak knife boasts sharp serrations and a point. It is a complement to the butter knife and is given while eating tough meat. It is the only sharp knife given at the dinner table.

  • Butter Knife: It is also known as a spreading knife, it features a blunt, flat blade that’s not meant for cutting. It is primarily used for spreading butter, certain cheeses, and more.

Meat Knives

  • Cleaver: Cleaver is a large knife with a rectangular blade. The blade doesn’t have to be highly sharp for it to be effective. It is used for cutting through soft bones, meat, and hard vegetables.

  • Carving: If not used independently, it is often bundled together with the slicing knife. To make it easier for your imagination, it is the knife you see at Thanksgiving when the turkey is ready to be cut. It can have up to 15 inches blade and an upswept point.

  • Slicing: It is longer than a carving knife and has a blunt point. It cuts thinner slices than a carving knife, which is excellent for sandwich meats. There are also special slicing knives for ham and salmon.

  • Electric Knife: It comes in two styles, i.e. electric carving knives and electric fillet knives. A tool in the handle pulls the blade back and forth to cut the meat. They are usually wireless. These are used for a professional cutting look.

  • Boning Knife: The name says a lot. It is a thin, narrow, and flexible knife with about 5.5 inches blade used for removing bones from meat, poultry, and fish.

  • Fillet Knife: This is a subset of the boning knife with the same design but greater flexibility. It is anywhere between 6 and 11 inches. It is specially used for fish preparation as it helps in separating fish skin from the flesh.

  • Butcher Knife: It boasts a large blade (14 inches) with a deep belly and a clip point. The primary use of a butcher knife is to butcher and dress animal carcasses.

  • Cimeter Knife: It is similar to a butcher knife except for the blade curves upward. The blades is from 10 to 12 inches.

  • Breaking Knife: It is similar to the cimeter with curved blades, but it is slightly lighter. It is used to break down larger chunks of meat into more manageable pieces. Just like the three previous knives, it is also used in the meat-processing industry.

Specialised Knives

  • Tomato Knife: This specialised knife has a fork at the tip for grabbing tomato slices. Though primarily used for tomatoes, you can also cut small pieces of bread or cooked meat in a pinch using this.

  • Oyster Knife: Several iterations of the oyster knife exist, including long and narrow or wide and blunt. An oyster knife has a short and thick blade optimised for prying open oysters and separating the meat.

  • Peeling Knife: It is a specialised paring knife with a small blade resembling a bird’s beak—short and curved to a point.

  • Cheese Knife: There is a lot of variety in cheese knives. In fact, there are around 12 types of cheese knives. Some have wide blades; others have holes and forks. They are used for cutting and serving cheese.

  • Sandwich Knife: Like the bread knife, it has a long, serrated blade used to cut bread. The significant difference is that it has an upswept handle that allows the blade to contact the cutting board while keeping space for your knuckles.

Japanese Knives

  • Santoku: Despite having Japanese origins, it’s widely used in kitchens across the United States. It has a straighter edge than the curved chef’s knife and a blunt point. It is a multipurpose kitchen knife but excels at slicing, dicing, and mincing.

  • Gyuto: Also known as the gyutou, it is the Japanese version of the chef’s, ranging from about 8 to 10 inches. It is another multipurpose knife with a curved belly for rocking the blade to cut like the chef’s knife.

  • Petty Knife: It is similar to paring or utility knives complementing santoku or gyuto. Petty knives are used for nuanced tasks that the larger knives can’t handle.

  • Honesuki: It is the Japanese boning knife with a triangular blade that’s significantly less flexible than its Western counterpart.

  • Usuba Knife: A Japanese vegetable knife with a single edge makes the blade exceptionally sharp and is mainly used by professionals.

  • Nakiri Knife: It is similar to the usuba knife with a rectangular blade, except it’s more widely used in home kitchens. It is primarily used for chopping vegetables.

  • Deba Knife: It is a pointed carving knife whose blade has a thick spine and can be 12 inches long. It’s used by butchers or fillet fish, but it’s also used for meat and poultry.

  • Yanagida: It is the knife used to prepare sashimi and sushi. It’s very long and thin since it is made to slice seafood by pulling the knife, not pushing it down. Due to the single bevel, it’s considered a more specialised knife.

  • Sujihiki: It can be compared to a slicing knife, but the blade is usually thinner and made of harder steel. Also, the blade features a double bevel. It has the same usage as Yanagida, except it’s much more versatile and you can use it for slicing fish and other meats.

Note: This is not an inclusive list!

If you think you can name every type of kitchen knife, well, you might think again after reading further!

General

  • Chef’s Knife: It is a straight-edged knife with a belly that curves toward the point. Its blade length varies from 6 inches to 14 inches, but its popular length is 8 inches. It is an all-purpose knife used for everything from cutting large pieces of beef to chopping vegetables.

  • Paring Knife: It is a smaller knife and often complements the chef’s knife. Its blade length remains between 3 inches to 4 inches. It is used to do all the finer work that an oversized chef’s knife can’t, such as deveining shrimp, peeling, and slicing.

  • Utility Knife: It looks the same and functions as a chef’s knife, but it’s smaller and certainly more versatile. Its blade length remians between 4 and 7 inches. Before the chef’s knife, this was the multipurpose knife, but now it’s been primarily used for tasks like cutting meat.

  • Bread Knife: Due to the large serrations, it is one of the most recognisable kitchen knives. It can feature blades up to 10 inches with serrations the entire length. Because of serrations, its uses are limited, but you can also cut tomatoes using this.

  • Table Knife: Table knife, also called a butter knife, is a standard kitchen knife that comes with every utensil set. It has a round blade with slight serrations. It is a versatile tool used while eating, including cutting things and spreading butter.

  • Steak Knife: The steak knife boasts sharp serrations and a point. It is a complement to the butter knife and is given while eating tough meat. It is the only sharp knife given at the dinner table.

  • Butter Knife: It is also known as a spreading knife, it features a blunt, flat blade that’s not meant for cutting. It is primarily used for spreading butter, certain cheeses, and more.

Meat Knives

  • Cleaver: Cleaver is a large knife with a rectangular blade. The blade doesn’t have to be highly sharp for it to be effective. It is used for cutting through soft bones, meat, and hard vegetables.

  • Carving: If not used independently, it is often bundled together with the slicing knife. To make it easier for your imagination, it is the knife you see at Thanksgiving when the turkey is ready to be cut. It can have up to 15 inches blade and an upswept point.

  • Slicing: It is longer than a carving knife and has a blunt point. It cuts thinner slices than a carving knife, which is excellent for sandwich meats. There are also special slicing knives for ham and salmon.

  • Electric Knife: It comes in two styles, i.e. electric carving knives and electric fillet knives. A tool in the handle pulls the blade back and forth to cut the meat. They are usually wireless. These are used for a professional cutting look.

  • Boning Knife: The name says a lot. It is a thin, narrow, and flexible knife with about 5.5 inches blade used for removing bones from meat, poultry, and fish.

  • Fillet Knife: This is a subset of the boning knife with the same design but greater flexibility. It is anywhere between 6 and 11 inches. It is specially used for fish preparation as it helps in separating fish skin from the flesh.

  • Butcher Knife: It boasts a large blade (14 inches) with a deep belly and a clip point. The primary use of a butcher knife is to butcher and dress animal carcasses.

  • Cimeter Knife: It is similar to a butcher knife except for the blade curves upward. The blades is from 10 to 12 inches.

  • Breaking Knife: It is similar to the cimeter with curved blades, but it is slightly lighter. It is used to break down larger chunks of meat into more manageable pieces. Just like the three previous knives, it is also used in the meat-processing industry.

Specialised Knives

  • Tomato Knife: This specialised knife has a fork at the tip for grabbing tomato slices. Though primarily used for tomatoes, you can also cut small pieces of bread or cooked meat in a pinch using this.

  • Oyster Knife: Several iterations of the oyster knife exist, including long and narrow or wide and blunt. An oyster knife has a short and thick blade optimised for prying open oysters and separating the meat.

  • Peeling Knife: It is a specialised paring knife with a small blade resembling a bird’s beak—short and curved to a point.

  • Cheese Knife: There is a lot of variety in cheese knives. In fact, there are around 12 types of cheese knives. Some have wide blades; others have holes and forks. They are used for cutting and serving cheese.

  • Sandwich Knife: Like the bread knife, it has a long, serrated blade used to cut bread. The significant difference is that it has an upswept handle that allows the blade to contact the cutting board while keeping space for your knuckles.

Japanese Knives

  • Santoku: Despite having Japanese origins, it’s widely used in kitchens across the United States. It has a straighter edge than the curved chef’s knife and a blunt point. It is a multipurpose kitchen knife but excels at slicing, dicing, and mincing.

  • Gyuto: Also known as the gyutou, it is the Japanese version of the chef’s, ranging from about 8 to 10 inches. It is another multipurpose knife with a curved belly for rocking the blade to cut like the chef’s knife.

  • Petty Knife: It is similar to paring or utility knives complementing santoku or gyuto. Petty knives are used for nuanced tasks that the larger knives can’t handle.

  • Honesuki: It is the Japanese boning knife with a triangular blade that’s significantly less flexible than its Western counterpart.

  • Usuba Knife: A Japanese vegetable knife with a single edge makes the blade exceptionally sharp and is mainly used by professionals.

  • Nakiri Knife: It is similar to the usuba knife with a rectangular blade, except it’s more widely used in home kitchens. It is primarily used for chopping vegetables.

  • Deba Knife: It is a pointed carving knife whose blade has a thick spine and can be 12 inches long. It’s used by butchers or fillet fish, but it’s also used for meat and poultry.

  • Yanagida: It is the knife used to prepare sashimi and sushi. It’s very long and thin since it is made to slice seafood by pulling the knife, not pushing it down. Due to the single bevel, it’s considered a more specialised knife.

  • Sujihiki: It can be compared to a slicing knife, but the blade is usually thinner and made of harder steel. Also, the blade features a double bevel. It has the same usage as Yanagida, except it’s much more versatile and you can use it for slicing fish and other meats.

Note: This is not an inclusive list!

1.3 Blade Material

Usually, discussions on knife blade materials revolve around the stainless steel vs carbon steel debate. However, a knife’s blade material isn’t limited to these two. Let’s look at blade materials in the most common categories.

  • Stainless Steel: There’s no such thing as stainless steel, as every type of steel rusts in different circumstances.
    Steel is stainless when it has at least a certain amount of chromium which adds resistance to corrosion, decay and wear. Some of the most common stainless steel in kitchen knives include VG-10, 420HC, and 440.

    The advantage of using stainless steel is that it’s less likely to rust than steel with higher amounts of carbon. And especially for kitchen knives, stainless steel is preferred since it comes in contact with food and juices, increasing the potential for stains. Also, stainless steel blades require less maintenance.
    On the downside, stainless steel suffers in performance. It does not have an edge as good as some of the other blade materials.

  • Carbon Steel: Stainless steels with a carbon content of around 1% are considered carbon steels. It doesn’t have significant amounts of chromium and often includes alloys like manganese and vanadium.

    A knife made of this material is valued for its reasonable price and ability to hold an edge. Moreover, a carbon steel knife is easy to sharpen and boasts a keen edge.

    The major disadvantage is the susceptibility to stains. Sometimes, the blade will develop a patina, which will change the steel’s texture and colour of the steel.

  • High-carbon Stainless Steel: This is steel with a higher carbon content than regular stainless steel. These are higher-grade stainless steel alloys.
    It offers increased strength, edge retention, and cutting ability without sacrificing its resistance to stains. Therefore, it offers best of both worlds.

  • Ceramic: Ceramic blades are sharpened to make a keen edge that rarely needs sharpening. It has thin edges, which makes it great at cutting fruits and vegetables. Unfortunately, it isn’t great for meat and frozen foods.

    The best thing about ceramic is its ability to thrive in harsh environments. It will not rust, and slicing it into acidic food will not have a harmful effect. In addition to the stainless qualities, the material is tough and lightweight.

    Ceramic blades are stronger and more durable than before, yet they are brittle than their steel counterparts. A ceramic blade doesn’t need sharpening for a long while, but only a professional can do that when it does.

  • Titanium: Titanium blades are softer than others, due to which it is found in a small number of kitchens.
    The major benefit of titanium blades is their neutral composition, i.e. they won’t have any chemical reactions with the food. Moreover, it is more flexible than steel.

    Unfortunately, it is an expensive and speciality material that’s not considered optimised for kitchen cutlery because it compromises cutting performance.

These were the major knife materials. However, there are a few more that you can find in the market, like plastic, taconite. These are much less common and doesn’t offer many advantages.

Usually, discussions on knife blade materials revolve around the stainless steel vs carbon steel debate. However, a knife’s blade material isn’t limited to these two. Let’s look at blade materials in the most common categories.

  • Stainless Steel: There’s no such thing as stainless steel, as every type of steel rusts in different circumstances.
    Steel is stainless when it has at least a certain amount of chromium which adds resistance to corrosion, decay and wear. Some of the most common stainless steel in kitchen knives include VG-10, 420HC, and 440.

    The advantage of using stainless steel is that it’s less likely to rust than steel with higher amounts of carbon. And especially for kitchen knives, stainless steel is preferred since it comes in contact with food and juices, increasing the potential for stains. Also, stainless steel blades require less maintenance.
    On the downside, stainless steel suffers in performance. It does not have an edge as good as some of the other blade materials.

  • Carbon Steel: Stainless steels with a carbon content of around 1% are considered carbon steels. It doesn’t have significant amounts of chromium and often includes alloys like manganese and vanadium.

    A knife made of this material is valued for its reasonable price and ability to hold an edge. Moreover, a carbon steel knife is easy to sharpen and boasts a keen edge.

    The major disadvantage is the susceptibility to stains. Sometimes, the blade will develop a patina, which will change the steel’s texture and colour of the steel.

  • High-carbon Stainless Steel: This is steel with a higher carbon content than regular stainless steel. These are higher-grade stainless steel alloys.
    It offers increased strength, edge retention, and cutting ability without sacrificing its resistance to stains. Therefore, it offers best of both worlds.

  • Ceramic: Ceramic blades are sharpened to make a keen edge that rarely needs sharpening. It has thin edges, which makes it great at cutting fruits and vegetables. Unfortunately, it isn’t great for meat and frozen foods.

    The best thing about ceramic is its ability to thrive in harsh environments. It will not rust, and slicing it into acidic food will not have a harmful effect. In addition to the stainless qualities, the material is tough and lightweight.

    Ceramic blades are stronger and more durable than before, yet they are brittle than their steel counterparts. A ceramic blade doesn’t need sharpening for a long while, but only a professional can do that when it does.

  • Titanium: Titanium blades are softer than others, due to which it is found in a small number of kitchens.
    The major benefit of titanium blades is their neutral composition, i.e. they won’t have any chemical reactions with the food. Moreover, it is more flexible than steel.

    Unfortunately, it is an expensive and speciality material that’s not considered optimised for kitchen cutlery because it compromises cutting performance.

These were the major knife materials. However, there are a few more that you can find in the market, like plastic, taconite. These are much less common and doesn’t offer many advantages.

1.4 Manufacturing

Blades of kitchen knives are manufactured in several ways, but forged, stamped, and full-tang are the most common. Let’s know about them in detail.

  • Forged: Forged means the blade is made from a single piece of steel that’s heated and then pounded into form. Then again, the blade is heated, cooled down quickly, and tempered. At last, it is polished and sharpened into the finished product.

    A forged blade comes with multiple advantages, including a thicker blade, heavier construction, usually features bolster, durability, and superior quality. Moreover, it typically holds a sharp edge. Unfortunately, these many advantages come at a hefty price.

  • Stamped: When a blade is made in a machine, it is called the stamped blade. The blade is cut from steel, usually using a hydraulic press, and then the piece is heat-treated. Further, the blanks are ground, polished, and sharpened. The qualities that a forged blade have are a thinner blade, lightweight and reasonably priced.

  • Full-tang: As mentioned above, that portion of a blade that extends into the handle is called the tang. A full tang means that the blade metal extends within the entire handle. Such a knife has a heavy handle, but a full tang offers balance, ultimately giving you better stability and control of the knife. Some knives are partial tangs, in which the tang only extends along the top of the handle. There is also rat-tail tang, which has a thin metal “tail” that extends into the handle and is fully enclosed within the handle.

Blades of kitchen knives are manufactured in several ways, but forged, stamped, and full-tang are the most common. Let’s know about them in detail.

  • Forged: Forged means the blade is made from a single piece of steel that’s heated and then pounded into form. Then again, the blade is heated, cooled down quickly, and tempered. At last, it is polished and sharpened into the finished product.

    A forged blade comes with multiple advantages, including a thicker blade, heavier construction, usually features bolster, durability, and superior quality. Moreover, it typically holds a sharp edge. Unfortunately, these many advantages come at a hefty price.

  • Stamped: When a blade is made in a machine, it is called the stamped blade. The blade is cut from steel, usually using a hydraulic press, and then the piece is heat-treated. Further, the blanks are ground, polished, and sharpened. The qualities that a forged blade have are a thinner blade, lightweight and reasonably priced.

  • Full-tang: As mentioned above, that portion of a blade that extends into the handle is called the tang. A full tang means that the blade metal extends within the entire handle. Such a knife has a heavy handle, but a full tang offers balance, ultimately giving you better stability and control of the knife. Some knives are partial tangs, in which the tang only extends along the top of the handle. There is also rat-tail tang, which has a thin metal “tail” that extends into the handle and is fully enclosed within the handle.

1.5 Edge

One of the biggest debates among chefs and cooking amateurs is whether a blade should be straight or serrated. Well, the reality is that it’s not a debate; there’s a time and place for each.

  • Straight-edged: Straight-edged knives are the most valuable and versatile. They call for a push cut through food instead of using a sawing motion. For example, for cutting through a piece of cheese or removing the skin off of an apple, you would push through the food. We recommend that if you get only one knife for your kitchen, it should be a straight edge.

  • Serrated: This is used less than a straight-edged blade because not many foods require a sawing motion to cut. Bread and tomatoes are the most common foods that require a serrated edge.

  • Granton: Have you seen strange grooves cut out in the edge of a kitchen knife, weel, that’s Granton edge. Yes, these are the hollowed-out grooves in the side of the blade that reduces friction and enhance slicing ability. A Granton edge can’t be compared to the above two types of edges because you can find these dimples on straight as well as serrated blades.

One of the biggest debates among chefs and cooking amateurs is whether a blade should be straight or serrated. Well, the reality is that it’s not a debate; there’s a time and place for each.

  • Straight-edged: Straight-edged knives are the most valuable and versatile. They call for a push cut through food instead of using a sawing motion. For example, for cutting through a piece of cheese or removing the skin off of an apple, you would push through the food. We recommend that if you get only one knife for your kitchen, it should be a straight edge.

  • Serrated: This is used less than a straight-edged blade because not many foods require a sawing motion to cut. Bread and tomatoes are the most common foods that require a serrated edge.

  • Granton: Have you seen strange grooves cut out in the edge of a kitchen knife, weel, that’s Granton edge. Yes, these are the hollowed-out grooves in the side of the blade that reduces friction and enhance slicing ability. A Granton edge can’t be compared to the above two types of edges because you can find these dimples on straight as well as serrated blades.

1.6 Handle Material

After the blade comes to the knife handle in the list of the essential parts of a kitchen knife. No matter how sharp & durable the blade is, if the handle is uncomfortable, you won’t be able to use the knife.

Handle options are very limited in kitchen knives. Here are the most common handles materials you’ll come across.

  • Wood: Wood is a standard handle material in the knives market and is well-known for its classic look and feel. It is a softer material that is very comfortable on the hands. Another benefit is the number of wood options you get, from olive wood to maple wood.
    Despite having so many advantages, wood has downsides as well. First and foremost is its vulnerability to bacteria. It is challenging to clean and sterilise a wooden handle completely. Also, they are less durable, which calls for extra care, including hand-washing and treatment with mineral oil.

  • Laminate: Laminated handles are made from laminated wood composites with plastic resin. They are gaining popularity because of their similarity in appearance and weight to wood, and they are much easier to clean and maintain.

    The so-called disadvantage is that some diehard knife enthusiasts may not like the fact that they’re not actually wood.

  • Synthetics: Synthetic handles can be polypropylene, fibro, plastics, and Santoprene. These handles are made from man-made materials and are much easier to maintain than wood handles because they don’t absorb bacteria.

    On the downside, when synthetics are exposed to extreme temperatures, it is possible to become brittle and susceptible to cracking. Exposure to UV rays can wear down these handles. Moreover, due to being very lightweight, it can cause an imbalance in the knife.

  • Stainless Steel: Out of all the materials, stainless steel is the most sanitary, easiest to maintain, extremely durable and looks sleek.

    Unfortunately, stainless steel handles are very heavy, shifting the knife’s balance toward the handle, causing hand fatigue. Also, it can be slippery when wet.

After the blade comes to the knife handle in the list of the essential parts of a kitchen knife. No matter how sharp & durable the blade is, if the handle is uncomfortable, you won’t be able to use the knife.

Handle options are very limited in kitchen knives. Here are the most common handles materials you’ll come across.

  • Wood: Wood is a standard handle material in the knives market and is well-known for its classic look and feel. It is a softer material that is very comfortable on the hands. Another benefit is the number of wood options you get, from olive wood to maple wood.
    Despite having so many advantages, wood has downsides as well. First and foremost is its vulnerability to bacteria. It is challenging to clean and sterilise a wooden handle completely. Also, they are less durable, which calls for extra care, including hand-washing and treatment with mineral oil.

  • Laminate: Laminated handles are made from laminated wood composites with plastic resin. They are gaining popularity because of their similarity in appearance and weight to wood, and they are much easier to clean and maintain.

    The so-called disadvantage is that some diehard knife enthusiasts may not like the fact that they’re not actually wood.

  • Synthetics: Synthetic handles can be polypropylene, fibro, plastics, and Santoprene. These handles are made from man-made materials and are much easier to maintain than wood handles because they don’t absorb bacteria.

    On the downside, when synthetics are exposed to extreme temperatures, it is possible to become brittle and susceptible to cracking. Exposure to UV rays can wear down these handles. Moreover, due to being very lightweight, it can cause an imbalance in the knife.

  • Stainless Steel: Out of all the materials, stainless steel is the most sanitary, easiest to maintain, extremely durable and looks sleek.

    Unfortunately, stainless steel handles are very heavy, shifting the knife’s balance toward the handle, causing hand fatigue. Also, it can be slippery when wet.

1.7 Storage

When you are buying a knife set, then there are a few more things to consider than just the sharpness and material of a knife. Knives suffer from natural wear and tear while cooking, but you can significantly extend their life by storing them properly. Some of the best ways to store knives are as follows:

  • Knife Block: This is the most common method of storing a knife. It is simple to use and offers an excellent presentation in kitchens without taking a lot of space. Some of the knife block materials are often made of are oak wood, ash wood, cherry wood, olive wood, rubberwood, bamboo, and stainless steel.

    Knife blocks come in different styles. For example, in traditional knife blocks, the knives used to go in at an angle. Then there are stainless steel blocks for completely vertical knives.

    The primary issue with knife blocks is that they are challenging to clean due to those small slits. Therefore, it is suggested that put a clean and dry knife in it.

    On the one hand, knife block offers proper storage space to knives, and on the other hand, certain knife blocks also dull knives because when you pull them out, the blade drags against the wood. To combat this, put the block on its side or get a block that rests knives on its sides.

  • Magnetic Strips: It is something that you attach to the wall, and the knives stick to it. It saves the knife blade from unnecessary wear. However, the wear is transferred to the tang because you put pressure while pulling the knife from the strip. Unlike knife block, it is more exposed, and you wouldn’t want this in a house that has kids because of the easy accessibility to the knives.

  • Knife Bag: Knife bags are not just for transportation, chefs recommend it for your home kitchen because it keeps your knives separated and protected more than any other storage method.

  • Drawer Tray: This storage method is like a knife block, except it’s inside your drawer. There are specific places in the drawer to insert your knife, so they don’t rub against one another. It is excellent to keep your knives organised without being displayed.

  • Knife Sheaths: The last storage method is sheaths. It protects each knife individually, but it can be annoying, especially if you have a lot of knives you need to put away. Also, it can be challenging to clean.

When you are buying a knife set, then there are a few more things to consider than just the sharpness and material of a knife. Knives suffer from natural wear and tear while cooking, but you can significantly extend their life by storing them properly. Some of the best ways to store knives are as follows:

  • Knife Block: This is the most common method of storing a knife. It is simple to use and offers an excellent presentation in kitchens without taking a lot of space. Some of the knife block materials are often made of are oak wood, ash wood, cherry wood, olive wood, rubberwood, bamboo, and stainless steel.

    Knife blocks come in different styles. For example, in traditional knife blocks, the knives used to go in at an angle. Then there are stainless steel blocks for completely vertical knives.

    The primary issue with knife blocks is that they are challenging to clean due to those small slits. Therefore, it is suggested that put a clean and dry knife in it.

    On the one hand, knife block offers proper storage space to knives, and on the other hand, certain knife blocks also dull knives because when you pull them out, the blade drags against the wood. To combat this, put the block on its side or get a block that rests knives on its sides.

  • Magnetic Strips: It is something that you attach to the wall, and the knives stick to it. It saves the knife blade from unnecessary wear. However, the wear is transferred to the tang because you put pressure while pulling the knife from the strip. Unlike knife block, it is more exposed, and you wouldn’t want this in a house that has kids because of the easy accessibility to the knives.

  • Knife Bag: Knife bags are not just for transportation, chefs recommend it for your home kitchen because it keeps your knives separated and protected more than any other storage method.

  • Drawer Tray: This storage method is like a knife block, except it’s inside your drawer. There are specific places in the drawer to insert your knife, so they don’t rub against one another. It is excellent to keep your knives organised without being displayed.

  • Knife Sheaths: The last storage method is sheaths. It protects each knife individually, but it can be annoying, especially if you have a lot of knives you need to put away. Also, it can be challenging to clean.

2. FAQ: Learn more about the details

2.1 What are the essential kitchen knives?

Home cooks can get away with just a single knife, but if you’re looking for the bare essentials, we’ve narrowed it down to the following knives.

  • Chef’s Knife: It is the multipurpose knife used for pretty much everything in the kitchen. You will be able to accomplish most of the tasks with this knife only.

  • Paring Knife: This mini chef’s knife is essential to do all those smaller jobs that can’t be done with a chef’s knife, like peeling fruit.

  • Bread Knife: Call it a bread knife or serrated knife. We believe every kitchen must have a serrated knife; otherwise, you’ll be eating a lot of crushed bread.

Home cooks can get away with just a single knife, but if you’re looking for the bare essentials, we’ve narrowed it down to the following knives.

  • Chef’s Knife: It is the multipurpose knife used for pretty much everything in the kitchen. You will be able to accomplish most of the tasks with this knife only.

  • Paring Knife: This mini chef’s knife is essential to do all those smaller jobs that can’t be done with a chef’s knife, like peeling fruit.

  • Bread Knife: Call it a bread knife or serrated knife. We believe every kitchen must have a serrated knife; otherwise, you’ll be eating a lot of crushed bread.

2.2 What knives do a chef recommend other than essential knives?

Those three knives are enough, but that doesn’t mean you can’t have more. There are other knives chefs recommend for a traditional kitchen, and here they are.

  • Utility Knife: A general-purpose knife falls between a chef’s knife and a paring knife. Unfortunately, some people find it a bit redundant if they have a paring knife.

  • Carving Knife: It is bigger than a chef’s knife and comes in handy to cut meat and larger food items such as melons.

  • Boning Knife: A boning knife is a little more flexibile in peeling fruit and filleting.

Those three knives are enough, but that doesn’t mean you can’t have more. There are other knives chefs recommend for a traditional kitchen, and here they are.

  • Utility Knife: A general-purpose knife falls between a chef’s knife and a paring knife. Unfortunately, some people find it a bit redundant if they have a paring knife.

  • Carving Knife: It is bigger than a chef’s knife and comes in handy to cut meat and larger food items such as melons.

  • Boning Knife: A boning knife is a little more flexibile in peeling fruit and filleting.

2.3 What are the advantages of a kitchen knife set?

Kitchen knife sets are gaining popularity due to their following benefits:

  • All the knives feature one design instead of having five knives that look completely different from one another. For some, this is a dealbreaker when thinking about buying knives a la carte.

  • People argue that certain knife sets don’t offer a great value because you end up with knives that you will never use, but that’s not always the case. Most knife sets include the essentials, while others have all the knives you could ever want.

  • The set is ideal for amateurs because you don’t have to go out and research individual kitchen knives. It takes the hassle of choosing and buying knives from a wide range of options in the kitchen away.

  • When you buy a set, you usually get everything you need and more such as a knife block for storage, honing steel, and sheers.

Kitchen knife sets are gaining popularity due to their following benefits:

  • All the knives feature one design instead of having five knives that look completely different from one another. For some, this is a dealbreaker when thinking about buying knives a la carte.

  • People argue that certain knife sets don’t offer a great value because you end up with knives that you will never use, but that’s not always the case. Most knife sets include the essentials, while others have all the knives you could ever want.

  • The set is ideal for amateurs because you don’t have to go out and research individual kitchen knives. It takes the hassle of choosing and buying knives from a wide range of options in the kitchen away.

  • When you buy a set, you usually get everything you need and more such as a knife block for storage, honing steel, and sheers.

2.4 What are the disadvantages of a kitchen knife set?

A kitchen knife set has its downsides, too, as listed below.

  • If you pick the knives with a set, you may feel like you are stuck with too many knives that you may never use and then buying knives individually will be better.

  • If you have to buy an assortment of knives, the set will be pricier than buying a la carte.

  • It’s not always the case, but some knife sets are not that greatly made as individual knives.

A kitchen knife set has its downsides, too, as listed below.

  • If you pick the knives with a set, you may feel like you are stuck with too many knives that you may never use and then buying knives individually will be better.

  • If you have to buy an assortment of knives, the set will be pricier than buying a la carte.

  • It’s not always the case, but some knife sets are not that greatly made as individual knives.

2.5 Are there any don’ts for a kitchen knife?

Yes, there are some things you should never do if you want to use the kitchen knife for a long duration.

  • Never leave knives dirty in the kitchen sink, as that is the fastest way to invite rust onto your knives.

  • Unless you are sure that the knife is dishwasher safe, never wash it with the machine! All the rubbing and clashing will chip the blade beyond repair.

  • Don’t put them at a place where they can rub against other items and get chipped. If you really want to leave them in a drawer, use a cover to protect the blade or put them in a drawer tray specially made for knives.

  • Knives should not clash on a hard surface like granite or metal. It will dull the knife and ruin it completely.

  • Beware of excessive sharpening as that can cause the blade’s edge to wear down causing the knife edge to become thicker and duller.

  • Do not use the sharpened edge of a knife to scrape food from a chopping board.

Yes, there are some things you should never do if you want to use the kitchen knife for a long duration.

  • Never leave knives dirty in the kitchen sink, as that is the fastest way to invite rust onto your knives.

  • Unless you are sure that the knife is dishwasher safe, never wash it with the machine! All the rubbing and clashing will chip the blade beyond repair.

  • Don’t put them at a place where they can rub against other items and get chipped. If you really want to leave them in a drawer, use a cover to protect the blade or put them in a drawer tray specially made for knives.

  • Knives should not clash on a hard surface like granite or metal. It will dull the knife and ruin it completely.

  • Beware of excessive sharpening as that can cause the blade’s edge to wear down causing the knife edge to become thicker and duller.

  • Do not use the sharpened edge of a knife to scrape food from a chopping board.

3. How-To: Usage hints and care instructions for a knife set

3.1 How to care for and maintain a knife set?

However incredible it may be, a knife set will last long only when taken care of properly. Here are some tips that can give your knife set a long life.

  • To keep the edges sharp, hone the knife after several uses, if not before every use. Honing can be done with a steel rod, or you can also use an electronic kit.

  • Please do not leave the knife dirty for too long, as the acid, water, and other food chemicals will eventually destroy the blade, leaving dark spots and rust on it. Therefore, wash the knives as soon as you are done using them.

  • Even if a knife is dishwasher safe, it’s still better washed by hand because your hands are more gentle than a dishwasher.

  • Let your knives dry naturally on a dish rack, or to minimise the chance of the blade getting rusted, dry them with a cloth right after washing.

  • A knife block is the best home for your knives as it protects the blades from dirt and minimises clashing among the knives or between them with other objects in the kitchen.

  • You can also use other storage sources, like magnetic strips, especially if you have a large knife set and you don’t like having to pull all of them out before getting the exact one.

  • A sharp blade is one that have a thin edge, so the edge is also prone to damage if it comes in contact with things it’s not designed to cut, like a ceramic plate or a metal countertop. Therefore, it is suggested to use a wooden cutting board. A plastic board can also be sued, but it may be a little difficult to sanitise it in the long run.

  • Always use the right knife for the purpose it is made. For example, cutting through bones should be done with a boning knife and a cleaver rather than a chef’s knife.

However incredible it may be, a knife set will last long only when taken care of properly. Here are some tips that can give your knife set a long life.

  • To keep the edges sharp, hone the knife after several uses, if not before every use. Honing can be done with a steel rod, or you can also use an electronic kit.

  • Please do not leave the knife dirty for too long, as the acid, water, and other food chemicals will eventually destroy the blade, leaving dark spots and rust on it. Therefore, wash the knives as soon as you are done using them.

  • Even if a knife is dishwasher safe, it’s still better washed by hand because your hands are more gentle than a dishwasher.

  • Let your knives dry naturally on a dish rack, or to minimise the chance of the blade getting rusted, dry them with a cloth right after washing.

  • A knife block is the best home for your knives as it protects the blades from dirt and minimises clashing among the knives or between them with other objects in the kitchen.

  • You can also use other storage sources, like magnetic strips, especially if you have a large knife set and you don’t like having to pull all of them out before getting the exact one.

  • A sharp blade is one that have a thin edge, so the edge is also prone to damage if it comes in contact with things it’s not designed to cut, like a ceramic plate or a metal countertop. Therefore, it is suggested to use a wooden cutting board. A plastic board can also be sued, but it may be a little difficult to sanitise it in the long run.

  • Always use the right knife for the purpose it is made. For example, cutting through bones should be done with a boning knife and a cleaver rather than a chef’s knife.

3.2 How to oil a knife?

Oiling the blades of kitchen knives, mainly carbon steel blades is an essential part of maintenance and will protect against rust and corrosion. Mineral grade oil must be preferred over cooking oil for this purpose as the latter can build up a sticky residue which is undesirable.

To oil a knife, first, dry the knife carefully. Now apply mineral oil.

This can be done after each use or only every few months.

Oiling the blades of kitchen knives, mainly carbon steel blades is an essential part of maintenance and will protect against rust and corrosion. Mineral grade oil must be preferred over cooking oil for this purpose as the latter can build up a sticky residue which is undesirable.

To oil a knife, first, dry the knife carefully. Now apply mineral oil.

This can be done after each use or only every few months.

4. Did you know: Interesting facts, figures and things to know about knife set

4.1 Knife is one of the earliest tools used by humanity. It appeared at least 2.5 million years ago.

4.2 Knives form the largest class of cutting implements known collectively as cutlery.

4.3 Knives have been used as weapons, tools and eating utensils since prehistoric times.

4.4 Only in recent times knives have been started used for table use.

4.5 Earlier knives were made from wood, stone, and bone.

4.6  In the 15th century, people used to bring their own knives while dining out, and if you would not do the same, you were in the minority.

4.7 In the late 1630s, French Cardinal Richelieu, changed the shape of the table knife through a decree.

4.8 The largest table knife measures 2.48 m in length, 19.5 cm in width and 8.2 cm in thickness. It was made by Claes Blixt (Sweden), in Limmared, Sweden, on 8 August 2013.

4.1 Knife is one of the earliest tools used by humanity. It appeared at least 2.5 million years ago.

4.2 Knives form the largest class of cutting implements known collectively as cutlery.

4.3 Knives have been used as weapons, tools and eating utensils since prehistoric times.

4.4 Only in recent times knives have been started used for table use.

4.5 Earlier knives were made from wood, stone, and bone.

4.6  In the 15th century, people used to bring their own knives while dining out, and if you would not do the same, you were in the minority.

4.7 In the late 1630s, French Cardinal Richelieu, changed the shape of the table knife through a decree.

4.8 The largest table knife measures 2.48 m in length, 19.5 cm in width and 8.2 cm in thickness. It was made by Claes Blixt (Sweden), in Limmared, Sweden, on 8 August 2013.

5. Our Picks: How we picked the best knife sets

We have tested the different knife sets for hobby chefs, keeping the field of cutting ease/pleasure, handle, cleaning, and robustness in mind.

We have tested the different knife sets for hobby chefs, keeping the field of cutting ease/pleasure, handle, cleaning, and robustness in mind.

5.1 Richardson Sheffield KYU knife block

  • The world-famous quality and design meet at Richardson Sheffield KYU knife block.

  • It is a package of excellent quality, performance, durability and value for money.

  • The set consists of a pine lacquered knife block, vegetable knife, universal knife, santoku, cutting knife, and bread knife.

  • The block guarantees safe storage of your knife set. It keeps the blades sharper for longer and is, therefore, more durable. Moreover, the narrow wooden block is only 8 cm wide and combines the traditional Japanese arch shape to fit in all kitchens. 

  • The knives are made using chrome molybdenum vanadium steel which gives a precision blade, excellent sharpness. The blade hardness scored 55 HRC+/- 1 in the Rockwell hardness test.

  • The handles have silk polish.

  • The comparison winner is ideal for both a novice and a professional chef. With a range of attractive designs crafted by experts for comfort, you are guaranteed to find something to suit your style and taste.

  • The knives are dishwasher safe but clean the block by hand.

  • The world-famous quality and design meet at Richardson Sheffield KYU knife block.

  • It is a package of excellent quality, performance, durability and value for money.

  • The set consists of a pine lacquered knife block, vegetable knife, universal knife, santoku, cutting knife, and bread knife.

  • The block guarantees safe storage of your knife set. It keeps the blades sharper for longer and is, therefore, more durable. Moreover, the narrow wooden block is only 8 cm wide and combines the traditional Japanese arch shape to fit in all kitchens. 

  • The knives are made using chrome molybdenum vanadium steel which gives a precision blade, excellent sharpness. The blade hardness scored 55 HRC+/- 1 in the Rockwell hardness test.

  • The handles have silk polish.

  • The comparison winner is ideal for both a novice and a professional chef. With a range of attractive designs crafted by experts for comfort, you are guaranteed to find something to suit your style and taste.

  • The knives are dishwasher safe but clean the block by hand.

5.2 Zwilling Twin Gourmet Knife block, 9-piece

  • Our runner up is another ideal set of knives coming with five knives to meet your requirement related to meat, fish, game, poultry, vegetables, fruit, bread and herbs. 

  • The set has a peeling and garnishing knife (blade length- 10 cm), universal knife (13 cm), carving knife (15 cm), chef’s knife (20 cm), bread knife (20 cm), meat fork (14 cm), scissors (21 cm), and sharpening steel.

  • The sharpening steel tool keeps the blades sharp.

  • The knives, scissors, and sharpening tools are made of stainless steel, and they have plastic handles. And the knife block is made of wood. After use, you can safely store the knives in the block.

  • Thanks to the hardness of 57 HRC, the set is sustainable, less vulnerable and do not rust.

  • A small sharpening angle of 30° has been provided to keep the knives in the knife block sharp for a long time.

  • The blades have long-lasting sharpness. They are strong thanks to the ice-hardened friodur blade.

  • This multi-knife block has proved to be best for many and may do the same for you.

  • Our runner up is another ideal set of knives coming with five knives to meet your requirement related to meat, fish, game, poultry, vegetables, fruit, bread and herbs. 

  • The set has a peeling and garnishing knife (blade length- 10 cm), universal knife (13 cm), carving knife (15 cm), chef’s knife (20 cm), bread knife (20 cm), meat fork (14 cm), scissors (21 cm), and sharpening steel.

  • The sharpening steel tool keeps the blades sharp.

  • The knives, scissors, and sharpening tools are made of stainless steel, and they have plastic handles. And the knife block is made of wood. After use, you can safely store the knives in the block.

  • Thanks to the hardness of 57 HRC, the set is sustainable, less vulnerable and do not rust.

  • A small sharpening angle of 30° has been provided to keep the knives in the knife block sharp for a long time.

  • The blades have long-lasting sharpness. They are strong thanks to the ice-hardened friodur blade.

  • This multi-knife block has proved to be best for many and may do the same for you.

5.3 Hecef Black Oxide Knife Set of 6

  • Hecef Black Oxide knife set is the only set on our list that doesn’t come with a block.

  • It consists of five knives and their matching safeguards.

  • It has 20cm chef and slicing, a bread knife, 17.78 cm santoku, a 12.7 cm utility knife, 8.89 cm paring knife.

  • The knives are jet black, and their blade is made of durable high carbon stainless steel. It has a 2.0-2.5mm sharp edge.

  • Professionally sharpened blade, the tapered ground makes the knives capable of any task.

  • The premium black oxide procedure makes knives corrosion and rust-resistant and ensures they never lose their premium colour.

  • The handles are made of PP (polypropylene) + TPR (thermo-plastic-rubber material), which are soft enough to offer comfort. Also, they are lightweight, making the knives suitable for most people.

  • This robust set has been made using a hollow ground blade to make sure you have a smooth cutting experience in your kitchen.

  • The knife set is ideal for handling most trifles in any circumstance, cutting, slicing, mating etc.

  • The knives come with the wonderful, same colour (black) knife protector making it suitable to take it into your bag to go outside. 

  • Hecef Black Oxide knife set is the only set on our list that doesn’t come with a block.

  • It consists of five knives and their matching safeguards.

  • It has 20cm chef and slicing, a bread knife, 17.78 cm santoku, a 12.7 cm utility knife, 8.89 cm paring knife.

  • The knives are jet black, and their blade is made of durable high carbon stainless steel. It has a 2.0-2.5mm sharp edge.

  • Professionally sharpened blade, the tapered ground makes the knives capable of any task.

  • The premium black oxide procedure makes knives corrosion and rust-resistant and ensures they never lose their premium colour.

  • The handles are made of PP (polypropylene) + TPR (thermo-plastic-rubber material), which are soft enough to offer comfort. Also, they are lightweight, making the knives suitable for most people.

  • This robust set has been made using a hollow ground blade to make sure you have a smooth cutting experience in your kitchen.

  • The knife set is ideal for handling most trifles in any circumstance, cutting, slicing, mating etc.

  • The knives come with the wonderful, same colour (black) knife protector making it suitable to take it into your bag to go outside. 

5.4 Velaze Stainless Steel Kitchen Knife Block

  • Velaze knife set is an entirely stainless steel set from head to toe.

  • It is a 14-piece, out of which 11 pieces are knives.

  • The 11 blades include the kitchen’s heart - chef’s knife, serrated bread knife to cut crusty bread easily,

    a utility knife to peel and stick meat and vegetables, a cutting blade, a carving knife to cut various fancy patterns on food and six serrated steak knives, which improve cutting efficiency.

  • The remaining three pieces include a sharpened steel bar to sharpen the blade, a pair of scissors to cut bones easily, poultry, fish and vegetables, and an acrylic stand that keep everything organised and clean.

  • The sharp blades are resistant to stains, rust and bacteria.

  • The knives are sharp for a precise cut and let you make beautiful creations in the kitchen. 

  • It has a very scientific and modern design. The knives feel comfortable in hand, are easy to use and ensure no fatigue. 

  • Velaze is a brand that specialises in kitchenware and offers exemplary after-sales service and long service life. 

  • Velaze knife set is an entirely stainless steel set from head to toe.

  • It is a 14-piece, out of which 11 pieces are knives.

  • The 11 blades include the kitchen’s heart - chef’s knife, serrated bread knife to cut crusty bread easily,

    a utility knife to peel and stick meat and vegetables, a cutting blade, a carving knife to cut various fancy patterns on food and six serrated steak knives, which improve cutting efficiency.

  • The remaining three pieces include a sharpened steel bar to sharpen the blade, a pair of scissors to cut bones easily, poultry, fish and vegetables, and an acrylic stand that keep everything organised and clean.

  • The sharp blades are resistant to stains, rust and bacteria.

  • The knives are sharp for a precise cut and let you make beautiful creations in the kitchen. 

  • It has a very scientific and modern design. The knives feel comfortable in hand, are easy to use and ensure no fatigue. 

  • Velaze is a brand that specialises in kitchenware and offers exemplary after-sales service and long service life. 

5.5 Zwilling Self-sharpening Knife Block, 7-Piece

  • Zwilling SharpBlock with KIS technology is a 7-piece set with high on technology.

  • The KIS technology procures the sharpness of your knives by sharpening them regularly. When you take out or insert a knife in the block, it is simultaneously pulled over the integrated ceramic sharpening stones and, therefore, sharpened.

  • The SharpBlock is made for knives from the Zwilling four-star series, which are also already included. The world-famous four-star series can master all challenges in the kitchen smoothly.

  • The package contains five knives, including a spick and garnishing knife (10 cm), a carving knife (20 cm), a chef’s knife (20 cm), a universal knife (13 cm), and a bread knife (20 cm). In addition, it also has multifunctional scissors from the Twin L series.

  • Right material hardness is essential for smooth working, and that’s why the blades of the four-star series are ice-hardened in the Friodur process.

  • The brand recommends hand cleaning with lukewarm water, a mild detergent, and a soft sponge to prevent premature wear due to aggressive cleaning agents.

  • Zwilling SharpBlock with KIS technology is a 7-piece set with high on technology.

  • The KIS technology procures the sharpness of your knives by sharpening them regularly. When you take out or insert a knife in the block, it is simultaneously pulled over the integrated ceramic sharpening stones and, therefore, sharpened.

  • The SharpBlock is made for knives from the Zwilling four-star series, which are also already included. The world-famous four-star series can master all challenges in the kitchen smoothly.

  • The package contains five knives, including a spick and garnishing knife (10 cm), a carving knife (20 cm), a chef’s knife (20 cm), a universal knife (13 cm), and a bread knife (20 cm). In addition, it also has multifunctional scissors from the Twin L series.

  • Right material hardness is essential for smooth working, and that’s why the blades of the four-star series are ice-hardened in the Friodur process.

  • The brand recommends hand cleaning with lukewarm water, a mild detergent, and a soft sponge to prevent premature wear due to aggressive cleaning agents.

5.6 Kitano 8-piece Knife Set

  • Bring far-east cooking philosophies into your own home with the 8-piece Kitano knife set.

  • The set has seven knives and a knife block.

  • The knives list includes a chef’s and bread knife of 20.5 cm, a filleting knife (21 cm), a universal knife (13 cm), a small cooking knife (12.5 cm), a Santoku knife (11 cm), and a peeling knife (8.5 cm).

  • It has enough knives to help you prepare fine sashimi, strip tender julienne or filleted beef medallions.

  • The seven different blade shapes are made of hardened blade steel providing the perfect work tool for chopping, deboning, filleting, dicing and mincing.

  • The Kitano precision blades sit safely in even small hands due to their lightweight and ergonomic handles. 

  • The matt black knife block proves to be ideal for storing the hard blades.

  • The set has a minimalistic design, and its streamlined shape takes up little room in any kitchen.

  • The plexiglass cover on the front side emphasises the cubic shape providing hygienic storage space for the knives. Bottom slots in the block prevent any build-up of bacteria.

  • Bring far-east cooking philosophies into your own home with the 8-piece Kitano knife set.

  • The set has seven knives and a knife block.

  • The knives list includes a chef’s and bread knife of 20.5 cm, a filleting knife (21 cm), a universal knife (13 cm), a small cooking knife (12.5 cm), a Santoku knife (11 cm), and a peeling knife (8.5 cm).

  • It has enough knives to help you prepare fine sashimi, strip tender julienne or filleted beef medallions.

  • The seven different blade shapes are made of hardened blade steel providing the perfect work tool for chopping, deboning, filleting, dicing and mincing.

  • The Kitano precision blades sit safely in even small hands due to their lightweight and ergonomic handles. 

  • The matt black knife block proves to be ideal for storing the hard blades.

  • The set has a minimalistic design, and its streamlined shape takes up little room in any kitchen.

  • The plexiglass cover on the front side emphasises the cubic shape providing hygienic storage space for the knives. Bottom slots in the block prevent any build-up of bacteria.

5.7 Jamie Oliver Acacia Knife Block 6 Pieces

  • Jamie Oliver 6-piece knife set has beautifully designed acacia woodblock and essential knives.

  • The list of knives includes a 20.5 cm bread knife, an 18.5 cm cutting blade, a 17.5 cm chef’s knife, a 14cm universal blade, a 13cm mini santoku, and a 10 cm vegetable knife. 

  • The set has a narrow, discreet design that fits perfectly into any kitchen.

  • The knives have continuous blades made of Japanese MOV stainless steel.

  • A stable, ergonomic handle provides excellent balance and extra weight for precise. Also, a description has been given at the end of each handle.

  • Jamie Oliver 6-piece knife set has beautifully designed acacia woodblock and essential knives.

  • The list of knives includes a 20.5 cm bread knife, an 18.5 cm cutting blade, a 17.5 cm chef’s knife, a 14cm universal blade, a 13cm mini santoku, and a 10 cm vegetable knife. 

  • The set has a narrow, discreet design that fits perfectly into any kitchen.

  • The knives have continuous blades made of Japanese MOV stainless steel.

  • A stable, ergonomic handle provides excellent balance and extra weight for precise. Also, a description has been given at the end of each handle.